Race and Student Achievement

The racial demographics of K-12 public schools in the United States are rapidly changing. The National Center for Educational Statistics (2019) reports that between 2015 and 2027, the percentage of White students enrolled in public schools is projected to decrease from 49% to 45% while percentages of Black, Latinx, and Indigenous students continues to increase.

Since 1975, national standardized test scores in both reading and math show White students pervasively and consistently achieving at significantly higher levels than African American, Latinx, and Indigenous (National Assessment of Educational Progress, 2019).

The growing misalignment between racially disparate achievement results and changing racial demographics in schools reveals an urgent problem regarding the educational experiences for students of color. Steps must be taken to interrupt this persistent pattern so that all students see academic gains.

Leadership and Student Achievement

The need for racially conscious school and district leaders remains fundamental to improving student achievement in the nation’s schools. The research is clear and consistent that school leaders are second only to teachers in impacting student achievement (Louis, Leithwood, Wahlstrom, & Anderson, 2010). The importance of racial equity and social justice leadership also exists in the literature. In fact, the literature described leadership with a focus on racial equity as a commitment to social justice, which “ensures equitable and optimal learning conditions for all children” (Merchant & Garza, 2015, p. 56) and included elements of diversity, race, gender, culture, disability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, power, and privilege (Guerra, Nelson, Jacobs, & Yamamura, 2013).

girl racial equity leadership background

Our Mission

In an era of unprecedented educational challenge, the Institute For Courageous Leadership is committed to the continuous development of school and district leaders who are driven by a moral imperative and lead with fearlessness, skill, self-knowledge, and racial competence.

Our Vision

Under your leadership, every student is engaged, educated, included, and fully achieves.

racial equity leadership mission girl

Our Mission Statement

We’re committed to the continuous development of school and district leaders who are driven by a moral, lead imperative, and lead with fearlessness, skill, self-knowledge, and racial competence. It is our vision that, under their leadership, every child is engaged, educated, included, and fully achieves.

Our Vision

Under your leadership, every student is engaged, educated, included, and fully achieves.

What we do

We respond to the current inequitable school experiences for Black and Brown students.

We engage school and district leaders to be racially conscious, knowledgeable, and best practice drivers dedicated to high achievement for all students– especially black and brown scholars.

We develop confidence and competence in school and district leaders through intentional self-study and examination of best practices that are racially and culturally relevant.

What we do

We respond to the current inequitable school experiences for Black and Brown students.

We engage school and district leaders to be racially conscious, knowledgeable, and best practice drivers dedicated to high achievement for all students– especially black and brown scholars.

We develop confidence and competence in school and district leaders through intentional self-study and examination of best practices that are racially and culturally relevant.

boy wondering racial equity leadership

Testimonials

what people are saying about Racial Equity Leadership

“Melissa Krull and Candace Raskin are exceptional leaders for educational equity. As superintendents, they were courageous and fearless in advocating for and adopting changes to serve students of color better. Their current work with educational administrators has been truly transformational.”

Dr. Aldo Sicoli
Superintendent
Roseville, Minnesota

“The Institute gave our leaders the capacity building we needed to examine the personal and professional roles we play in rightsizing systems for deserving scholars. They bring deep leadership expertise, acute observational analysis, and multimedia instructional techniques to facilitate learning through dialogue, role plays, and feedback protocols designed to push leader thinking.”

Dr. Rhoda Mhiripiri-Reed
Superintendent
Hopkins Public Schools, MN

“The work that is done through the Institute allows administrators an opportunity to build their toolkits and skills to be centered when faced with confronting racial incidents in the school setting. As an African American female administrator, I needed to learn how to navigate conversations about race so that the individuals I am working with are moved to action.”

Dr. Carla Hines
Principal
Richfield, MN